Posts Tagged With: kodachrome 40

Pro8mm to launch weekly podcast: The Home Movie Legacy Project

 

website header with text

 

December 20, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Pro8mm of Burbank, CA launches a weekly pod cast commencing January 9, 2013 that compliments their new division, Home Movie Legacy, www.homemovielegacy.com

 

rhondasmall

The Home Movie Legacy Project will air live on Wednesdays at 4PM Pacific Time (7EST) with your host, Rhonda Vigeant (author of GET “REEL” ABOUT YOUR HOME MOVIE LEGACY…Before It’s too Late!) If you are the family historian passionate about preserving and sharing family films, a filmmaker wanting to use legacy or found footage in a documentary, a wedding or life-style filmmaker wanting to include super 8 film in your work, a production manager looking to incorporate Super 8 film in a current project, a genealogy buff, memory keeper, or archivist, this show is for you!

http://rockstarradionetwork.com/shows/thehomemovielegacyproject

radio-logo-300x124

Rhonda will draw upon her many years of running Pro8mm, a company known worldwide as being the Super 8 experts for production and legacy footage for over 4 decades. Pro8mm has developed proprietary technology for the entertainment industry to use Super 8 film in today’s most popular television shows (American Idol, The New Normal, The Neighbors, American Horror Story), theatrical releases (Argo, Super 8, The Fighter) and dozens of music videos, commercials for national brands and Independent Films.  They have worked on thousands of super 8 and 16mm projects for the entertainment industry, and have handled millions of feet of film to archive the legacies of the world’s most famous faces. They have digitized historical material for hundreds of documentaries, as well as Presidential Libraries, and Museums.

Some shows will focus on compelling interviews with people who are sharing their personal story using home movies from the past and the present, sharing what was discovered, what was challenged or what was confirmed. Other shows will feature technical content with guest speakers that will teach you how to best move your analog media into your digital life, including how to organize it, repurpose it, share it on social media, or monetize it for a wider audience.  A filmmaker forum segment featuring Phil Vigeant, President of Pro8mm, and author of The Power of Super8 Film: Insider Secrets Every Filmmaker Should Know, (Rhonda’s business partner, husband and tech guru) will be routinely included to help you learn what the entertainment industry does with their digital assets, tips on how to become head of your own personal studio, and why filmmakers can and should continue to shoot on film in a digital world. Home Movie Legacy isn’t just about grandpa’s old home movies. The term is all-inclusive and casts a wide net on the past, present and future independent filmmaking.

Rhonda is completely passionate about the value of legacy home movies in particular, and educating people how to best care for and share them.

“Everyone has a legacy and Home Movies are a living, recorded history of our lives, our family, our community, relationships, celebrations, the way we looked, dressed, and interacted. If a picture is worth a thousand words than a home movie must be worth a million. No where else can we rekindle those moments of times gone by or see ourselves interacting with our loved ones who have passed away. It jolts the memory with such a strong emotion in a way that nothing else can. My life’s work has been dedicated to the belief that not only is it important to see these images, but it is equally as important to preserve them with integrity for future generations so your family legacy on film lives! My show will be a call to action to GET “REEL” ABOUT YOUR HOME MOVIE LEGACY…. BEFORE It’s TOO LATE!”, while enjoying stories about the masses and the moguls who launched their careers by shooting home movies on film and continue to make it a vital part of their professional work today”.

Check Our Calendar http://www.homemovielegacy.com/calendar/ to view upcoming guests!

If you would like to be considered to be a guest on the show, email me, Rhonda@homemovielegacy.com

 

 

 

                 2805 West Magnolia Blvd, Burbank, CA 91505

Categories: Home Movie Archiving, super 8 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

8 Tips for Shooting Modern Super 8 #6 THE MECHANICS OF FILM

#6  The Mechanics of Film

Pro8logo4_C(SMALLest

Super 8 film is a technology based strongly on mechanical principles.  Understanding a little about how the film travels through the camera will go a long way in helping you to  get great super 8 images and avoid a lot of frustration.   One of the important parts of the mechanics of shooting with film is being aware of when the film is running through the camera.  Even though super 8 film comes in a convenient cartridge and is easy to load, the camera and film have to work together.    One common problem for many new filmmakers is understanding that in a super 8 camera the footage counter works off the spinning of the take up, not actually the film moving through the camera.   Therefore, as the take up is spinning it counts off the footage.   This actually has nothing to do with whether film is moving through your camera. The take up spindle is designed with a slip clutch mechanism so that it always spins regardless if it is actually taking up film or not.  What can happen is that you think you are shooting because the camera is running, but no film is actually being exposed.  The most common mistake is  that the roll of film has been totally shot and the filmmaker is unaware of this and keeps shooting.  Often times in the excitement of shooting you fail to notice the end of the roll signal. Different cameras have different  ways of indicating you are at the end of the roll, so check out how it is YOUR camera signals this.   If you happen to  take a cartridge out of your camera and then reinsert it, the footage counter will reset to zero.   It does not know that you may have already shot some of the film.

The second problem is that sometimes a roll of film will jam, or perhaps  it never got started in the first place.   Sometimes this can be a problem with the cartridge, but usually it is with the the camera.  When you first put a roll of film in a camera, the film must engage the camera’s claw mechanism,  aligning the sprockets of the film with the camera’s claw.  Typically, this will happen automatically, but if the guides are  out of alignment, this might not take place at all and the roll will never start.   It’s an easy fix.   Usually just taking the cartridge out and reinserting it in the camera.   However if your not aware of the problem, you will shoot for the next 3 minutes and get no pictures.  The cartridge can also jam.  The most common jam problems are not the cartridge, but the cameras.   If the clutch of the take-up spindle is weak it will have trouble keeping  pace with the advancing film pulled down by the claw.  The film will build up in the take up chamber of the camera, and  at some point will not be able to support the back up and simply quit.    If you take a cartridge that has jammed like this out of the camera and turn the take up spindle to wind up the access you can typically reinsert the cartridge and start filming again.  Many super 8 cameras use the clutches spinning to tell them the roll has ended.  If the clutch is weak, the camera will keep shutting down, thinking it is at the end of the roll.  As you gain experience with super8 you will become aware of the sound film makes going through your camera.

The first indicator you  may have of  problems is when you pull a finished roll of film from your camera and it is not at the end.  With some films, there is and actual stamp on the film that says exposed.  On others it will simply pull out of the cartridge.  When you take out a cartridge, if  the film looks like it did when you loaded the camera you have some investigating to do. You should always try to run your rolls out to the end.  You do this for two reasons.   First it tells you that you have shot the roll in the first place and second,  if it does not roll out you need to investigate the issue.  It is very easy to re-shoot something or grab another take when you are in the moment.  It is often impossible to return a week later to get a shot you are  missing.

In addition to the film physically moving through the camera, it has to register each frame at  18 or 24 times a second in perfect position to get good stability from the resulting photography.  What this means is a balance must be present between the cartridge, the camera’s calibration and the type of film to make good super 8 images that have good stability or registration.

The state of super 8 is always evolving.  Most super 8 cameras are no longer in tip-top shape and freshly calibrated from the factories they were born in.   In addition,  most super 8 technology was originally  centered around one stock (Kodachrome 40) made by one manufacture.   All camera manufactures set up their new super 8 cameras to work best with that film.  Today you have over 25 different super 8 films made by different companies that all have different characteristics when running through a super 8 camera.  In addition, super 8 cameras are aging and change with the aging process.

This is not all bad.  Remember,  it is a balance between the cameras, the film and the cartridge that makes it work.  For example many older,  less expensive super 8 camera have too much take-up torque because the slip clutch system has dried out and no longer slips when it should slip.  If you shot Kodachrome 40 with these cameras or black and white traditional  reversal film, it will often produce very poor registration of the images.  If you take that same old camera and give it color negative film which is a little thicker  and has a base coating which will provide some extra drag, this combination will tend to work much better.  My experience is that different cameras just seem to like different film stocks based on the way they have aged.  If a camera has a worn down gate with a clutch that no longer slips and the exposure system is off by 2 stops you have a choice of fixing it, throwing it away or give it a different film stock that is thicker and  provides more drag with greater exposure latitude.   It will work just as well as it did when new with traditional film because  the camera was calibrated to thinner stock with less drag and tighter exposure tolerance.   My dad would say, “You either raise the bridge or lower the dam”.   The best and cheapest way to see if a given type of film is going to work well in a given camera at a given speed is to shoot a test roll.  If you are just starting in Super  8 this is the best place to check out many issues.  Do not worry about charts.  Just shoot a roll in the conditions you want to shoot in with your best effort to get it in focus with the right exposure.  Once you establish a base, you can expand your testing each time you shoot by experimenting with different stocks, speeds and exposures.  You can also use this test to check out your digital workflow.  For about $100.00 you can purchase a roll or Super 8 , including the processing , prep and Scan to digital even in HD.  (c) Pro8mm ™ Phil Vigeant 2009

Did you know that one of the improvements  Pro8mm makes to all the Beaulieu and Canon cameras that we rebuild is to increase the pick up torque?   This is because negative film stocks are thicker than traditional reversal stocks .  We do this so that the film goes through the camera better, improves registration and minimizes cartridge jams.  – Rhonda  www.pro8mm.com

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

* 8 Tips For Shooting Modern Super 8 #3 Exposure

exposure

#3   Correct Exposure:

Having the correct exposure is one of the most critical aspects of getting the best-looking super8 pictures. There are books written on this subject where you can learn the nuances of lighting and exposure reading.   The fundamental issue for super8 filmmakers today is that too many filmmakers are relying on their aging super8 cameras internal exposure system to make this critical setting.  Some of these systems were not even that good when they where new,  let alone 30 to 40 years down the road.  Photography is after all, painting with light.   To get your best results, you have to learn about light, how it relates to different film stocks, and how to choose the best exposure setting.  My super8 images improved dramatically when I bought an inexpensive light meter (About $75.00)  started taking some readings and doing some experimentation.  I found that even the factory settings prescribed by the manufacture of both the film and cameras were not always optimum to make the best-looking Super8 pictures.  So many factors affect your exposure.  Did you know that your best exposure would be different based on if you are in wide or telephoto on your zoom?  For your camera’s internal system to work, it has to be able to recognize the notch system in the super8 cartridge and be calibrated for it to work well.  The ASA notches were designed to cover a wide range of ASA original films from 40 to 640 ASA measure in 2/3 stop increments.  Some Super8 cameras can only recognize a single setting where others can read all six notches.    None of this means much if the system has not been calibrated in 15 years.  Once you own a light meter it is possible the do some comparisons if only to understand how your system is working. I use my cameras internal system all the time but I always have my light meter to check and compare settings. (c) Pro8mm ™, Phil Vigeant 2009

• You might be interested to know that at Pro8mm , one of the things we do when we rebuild cameras  such as the Canon 1014 XLS and Canon 814 to become modern filming tools is that we calibrate the exposure system.  We  notch the cartridges of the film we load to correspond with the closest ASA’s the camera system can accommodate .  Below is an excerpt from our  Max 8 (Canon) 1014 XLS manual, which is available on our website at http://www.pro8mm.com.

a. Advanced Exposure Calibration for Modern Super 8

The Advanced Exposure Calibration System in the Max8 1014 provides accurate film exposures for all modern film stocks that range from 50-500 ASA. Most super 8 cameras were designed and calibrated to make their best pictures using Kodachrome film. With the discontinuance of Kodachrome 40, it is time to establish new standards and calibrate cameras to the modern film stocks now widely used. In our test of eight Canon 1014’s we purchased used, the average internal exposure was off by an average of 2 Stops.  The new Pro8mm notch system is designed to provide accurate film exposures over a range of five ASA designations. Calibrated in 2/3 F stop increments, this system can tell a properly calibrated camera the best way to expose all Super 8 film stocks. Super 8 cameras that can be  calibrated to register this range of film will produce superior image to those that can not.

• b. Pro8mm Advanced Cartridge Notching for Super 8

.8 Notch (40 ASA) Used for Pro8/01 50D (Old K40 Notch)

.7 Notch (64 ASA) Used for Pro8/22T and Super8/80T

.6 Notch (100 ASA) Pro8/12, Pro/85

.5 Notch (160 ASA) Pro8/43, Pro8/17

.4 Notch (250 ASA) Pro8/05, Pro8/53, Pro8/63

.3 Notch (400 ASA) Pro8/92, Pro/73, Pro8/18,Pro8/47 (Used for 500 ASA Film)

The advanced super 8 cartridge notching is designed to provide accurate film exposures with modern super 8 film that ranges from 50 to 500 ASA.  (c) Pro8mm 2009   www.pro8mm.com

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

8 Tips For Shooting Modern Super 8 #2 The 85 Filter

Now here is a topic of controversy and conversation…the good old 85 filter.  There are many differences of opinion about the 85 filter.  This is ours  at Pro8mm.   – Rhonda

85 filter

85 filter

 

#Tip #2      The 85 Filter Situation

In the beginning, all super8 film was Tungsten Balanced, which means that the film will produce true colors under tungsten light.  If you wanted to get correct colors in daylight, you had to use an orange filter called an 85 (sometimes called 85A).  For convenience, every Super 8 camera was built with an internal 85 filter.  The filter was usually in place because most filming was done outside in daylight.  There were some clever ways to take out the filter when you were filming in Tungsten (Interior)  light.  The filter removal system could be activated by the super8 cartridges notch system,  or by a switch, or by sticking something into a place in the camera to take it out or some combination of these things.

Every super 8 camera manufacturer had their own idea as to how this should be done.  Today, you have dozens of super8 film stocks that can be either daylight or tungsten color balanced.  When you film in daylight with daylight film, you do not want to use an 85 filter.  At Pro8mm we   have been taking the internal filters out of super8 cameras for many years now.  When this is done correctly, it can greatly improve the optical performance of a camera.   These inernal filters are often made of plastic which deteriorate over time and can greatly interfere with the quality of the image.  They are also dirt magnets!   Today because you can buy daylight film, it is actually inconvenient to have the internal 85 filter.   Some film manufacturing companies prescribe to the cartridge notch for 85-filter removal   and some do not.  The standards  for dealing with  this 85 thing are a mess,  so it is up to you,  the filmmaker to understand what the 85 filter is and  how your  camera handles this.  You need to make sure  that  you are using the correct film for your filming environment, daylight or tungsten.  Although you can do some amazing color, correction in post,  if you do not get this right you will never achieve the brilliance in color your images can have.   In addition, all this correcting takes time, which cost money.  What make this a little challenging is in most super8 cameras the 85 was placed behind the viewfinder optic where it can not be seen.  If your camera has a switch or you  can toggle between the two settings  for filter in and out , you will not be able to see the effect of having the filter in by looking in the viewfinder.

You must open up the camera door where you insert the film and look through the camera body.   Put your eye in line with what the film will see.  You must run the camera in order  to see through it.     It also will help if you point the camera at something darker so the exposure system is open, or manually set the camera to keep the  exposure wide open.  Once you find a position where you can see light through the camera body,  flip the switch that goes between the 85 filters in and out. You should see the light turn a darker orange when the filter is in.  However, you are not done. Take the super8 cartridge you are about to use and put it in the camera.  While doing so, look to see if it is flipping a lever in the camera.  Now go back to check your camera and make sure that the position of  the cartridge has not effected the switching.  The other approach is to make sure all your settings are correct and the cartridge has the correct notch for the 85 filters.  A cartridge with a notch for the 85 filters will not remove the filter automaticly.   A cartridge without a notch will automatically remove the filter.  In some cameras, an external switch can override this, but in others, if the notch removes the 85 filter it cannot be returned with the switch.       (c) Pro8mm ™  , by Phil Vigeant, 2009

Cartridge on left is 7219 without 85 filter notch. On right, the notch added by Pro8mm

Cartridge on left is 7219 without 85 filter notch. On right, the notch added by Pro8mm

One thing  you may find interesting in that we repackage the Kodak Vision 3 7219  which we call Pro8/19 ASA 500T with  our  prepaid processing and add the correct notch for the 85 filter.  ($30 stock and processing…add a scan to Pro Ress  that inclues prep and clean for one stop work flows with progressive discount, a  yummy deal!) www.pro8mm.com

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

8 Tips For Shooting Modern Super 8 #1 Brush Your Camera Gate

Ugh… there  is a hair  in the camera gate!  Nothing is more aggravating for  us and to you  when we  get absolutely gorgeous footage up on the scanner and there  is a big yucky piece of dirt or hair in the frame.  Just a small effort on your part will make your footage sparkle!  BRUSH YOUR CAMERA GATE! – Rhonda

# 1   Hair in the Gate:

“Because of the nature of film and the way it travels through a camera and exposes each frame, the system will build up debris in the gate.  If  it is  allowed to accumulate,  this  will block some of the image.  The metal gate frames the film with what should be a smooth black border.   Because you are running film over metal, it tends to leaves tiny deposits on the gate as the film passes over it.  This emulsion residue is a gummy substance that is barely visible to the naked eye.  If this is not cleaned  from your camera, from time to time you can have several problems.   First, the gummy glue can trap foreign substances like hair, lint, and dust and hold it firmly, often where the image is taken in a camera.  This  results   in these  ugly black globs  which start around the boarder that blocks some of your image usually on the edges,  but sometimes  big enough to block a lot of picture.   Depending on the size of these foreign obstacles, a hair in the gate can ruin a shot.   In addition, the build up of emulsion can get so bad that your camera can physically scratch the film.   The fix for these problems is very simple.   Go to the store and purchase a child’s toothbrush.  Gently brush a few strokes between every cartridge.   Every, single, cartridge!   It is amazingly simple but incredibly effective.   Do not use compressed air as all that will do is blow dirt around, and  it might blow debris into somewhere you cannot get it out.   In addition, compressed air does not often have the force to move the object because remember, it is stuck in place.    Do not use a Q-tip, as the chance of leaving a fiber of cotton is greater then the good you will do by performing the cleaning.”                                                                                     (c) Pro8mm ™ , by Phil Vigeant 2009

If your camera has never been cleaned,  you might need to do some more extensive work.  Once it is clean, the brush trick is all that should be need to keep you hair free.

Pro8mm includes a free camera gate brush with every rental or purchase.  They are also available for sale  on our website for $5.00  at  www.pro8mm.com.   A nifty little  tool  that fold up small and has  an attached cover, so you don’t have to worry about loosing it.     Once you use it on your camera, we do not advise using it as a substitute for gum or mints when you  have been on the set all day, or for that matter, the other way around!  www.pro8mm.com

Our Tip #2 will be on THE 85 Filter Situation.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

8 Tips For Shooting Modern Super 8

I decided that instead of giving you all 8 tips at once, I would give you one a day so that hopefully you will keep coming back and read my Super 8 blog!   While some of the tips I am going to give you are “old school” common sense that any film maker working with super 8 or 16mm film  should do/should have done at any time in their shooting career , some have to do directly with the new modern negative film stocks, our Max 8,  16 x 9 super 8 cameras and native 1080 HD scanning.  These tips were written by Phil Vigeant, the owner of Pro8mm.  I look forward to your comments.  – Rhonda

A Few tips can go a long way, by Phil Vigeant, owner and senior colorist at Pro8mm

“Parts of my job as senior colorist at Pro8mm, is that I get to scan about a million feet of super8 film each year.  In doing so I get to see what is happening in the super8 world with some vantage point based on volume.   I look at my work as a two-part job. One, as a creative colorist, trying to get the most information off of the frames for our customers, and second, as an inspector looking for bugs in the over all super8 process.   When I see something that needs improving, I try to see what I can do with the technology at hand to facilitate a positive change.  Internally, I can talk to my employees who are the people most responsible for each area and together we try to attack the issue.  Externally, it is much more difficult.   You have competitive concerns to address, and some companies just do not see these problems as issues the way I might.   In addition, there are things that are totally beyond my control that can play a major roll in great looking super8 footage.   These things are up to the filmmaker.  Each year the technology for scanning film to digital seems to improve, resulting in more things that I can fix.   Native 1080 HD film scanning now provides me with tremendous processing power to do many things that were impossible just a year ago.  There are new things on the horizon as well, which will give us even greater ability to improve an imperfect image.   However, there are a few things that if the filmmaker does not get right, there is very little that can be done to remedy the problem, no matter how much technology you have at hand.

As the years progress the problems seem to change and evolve with each new generation.   For those who grew up with film as the main picture-taking medium some things were learned at every juncture of the photographic process. Things such as focus were so common knowledge of that generation that we often forget that this is knowledge that you have to learn. A colleague of mine who teaches film making here in California said that he has to spend days of the semester going over some of this basic stuff.   Therefore, here is my short list 2009 of the 8 most common areas of concern I see every day in transferring film.  I hope that a few quick tips and expatiation can help you create better images with your super8 camera.” – Phil Vigeant

TIP #1 regarding HAIR IN THE GATE will be posted tomorrow

(c) Pro8mm

Innov8ing Super 8

Innov8ing Super 8

http://www.pro8mm.com

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pro8mm Now Blogging on WordPress

When I started blogging about my company Pro8mm last year, I expected that people would be interested in reading what I had to say.  Curent informnation about Super 8 is somewhat scarce.   There does not seem to be many people  or companeis with the experience of  Pro8mm   offering up fresh information about Super 8 film, processing, cameras, or scanning to HD in native 1080.  Much of what I read in chatrooms and forums is incorrect, or atleast  partially incorrect.   I find that the  whole chatroom thing on www.Filmshooting.com   and  www.Cinematography.com  with Super8 threads seem to be more of a battle of the self-appointed authorities than up to date  and current information that filmmakers can actually use.   I know all about my competitors products and services,  what they say they do (but often do not) , what kind of equipment hey have, and what they say about Pro8mm to position themselves as the better vendor.   So, we have opted to bow out, because we just have too much integrity to play that game, and  much to the dismay of some of our good friends and supporters who say we should “defend ourselves” .    We feel that Giles Perkins, who started www.onsuper8.org   5 years ago, is on the right track, and does a FANTASTIC job of of getting really good info out to those who need it .  If more poeple blogging about Super 8 would follow his lead, all filmmakers would be better off.  In the end, that is who is hurt by half  truths, posturing, etc. 

I looked at Amazon.com today and found out that their has not been a book written about Super 8 Film making  for sale to the general public since 1981.  While we do have another blog, (www.pro8mm-burbank.blogspot.com) , I just do not have much of a readership.  Maybe it is because I could not get  Pro8mm (it was taken).  Anyway, I am going to renew my commitment to a daily blog.  As inventors of Super 8 negative film and Max 8, a 16 x 9 widescreen format, we are really excited to share with the next generation of filmmakers the success stories of the thousands of  projects that have been shot on Super 8 film through Pro8mm.  We hope these will inspire you you pick up a super 8 camera, some super 8 film and start shooting.  If you have not already done so, check us out at www.pro8mm.com .  Tomorrow look for my 8 Tips for Shooting Modern Super 8.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.