Posts Tagged With: home movies

Pro8mm to launch weekly podcast: The Home Movie Legacy Project

 

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December 20, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Pro8mm of Burbank, CA launches a weekly pod cast commencing January 9, 2013 that compliments their new division, Home Movie Legacy, www.homemovielegacy.com

 

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The Home Movie Legacy Project will air live on Wednesdays at 4PM Pacific Time (7EST) with your host, Rhonda Vigeant (author of GET “REEL” ABOUT YOUR HOME MOVIE LEGACY…Before It’s too Late!) If you are the family historian passionate about preserving and sharing family films, a filmmaker wanting to use legacy or found footage in a documentary, a wedding or life-style filmmaker wanting to include super 8 film in your work, a production manager looking to incorporate Super 8 film in a current project, a genealogy buff, memory keeper, or archivist, this show is for you!

http://rockstarradionetwork.com/shows/thehomemovielegacyproject

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Rhonda will draw upon her many years of running Pro8mm, a company known worldwide as being the Super 8 experts for production and legacy footage for over 4 decades. Pro8mm has developed proprietary technology for the entertainment industry to use Super 8 film in today’s most popular television shows (American Idol, The New Normal, The Neighbors, American Horror Story), theatrical releases (Argo, Super 8, The Fighter) and dozens of music videos, commercials for national brands and Independent Films.  They have worked on thousands of super 8 and 16mm projects for the entertainment industry, and have handled millions of feet of film to archive the legacies of the world’s most famous faces. They have digitized historical material for hundreds of documentaries, as well as Presidential Libraries, and Museums.

Some shows will focus on compelling interviews with people who are sharing their personal story using home movies from the past and the present, sharing what was discovered, what was challenged or what was confirmed. Other shows will feature technical content with guest speakers that will teach you how to best move your analog media into your digital life, including how to organize it, repurpose it, share it on social media, or monetize it for a wider audience.  A filmmaker forum segment featuring Phil Vigeant, President of Pro8mm, and author of The Power of Super8 Film: Insider Secrets Every Filmmaker Should Know, (Rhonda’s business partner, husband and tech guru) will be routinely included to help you learn what the entertainment industry does with their digital assets, tips on how to become head of your own personal studio, and why filmmakers can and should continue to shoot on film in a digital world. Home Movie Legacy isn’t just about grandpa’s old home movies. The term is all-inclusive and casts a wide net on the past, present and future independent filmmaking.

Rhonda is completely passionate about the value of legacy home movies in particular, and educating people how to best care for and share them.

“Everyone has a legacy and Home Movies are a living, recorded history of our lives, our family, our community, relationships, celebrations, the way we looked, dressed, and interacted. If a picture is worth a thousand words than a home movie must be worth a million. No where else can we rekindle those moments of times gone by or see ourselves interacting with our loved ones who have passed away. It jolts the memory with such a strong emotion in a way that nothing else can. My life’s work has been dedicated to the belief that not only is it important to see these images, but it is equally as important to preserve them with integrity for future generations so your family legacy on film lives! My show will be a call to action to GET “REEL” ABOUT YOUR HOME MOVIE LEGACY…. BEFORE It’s TOO LATE!”, while enjoying stories about the masses and the moguls who launched their careers by shooting home movies on film and continue to make it a vital part of their professional work today”.

Check Our Calendar http://www.homemovielegacy.com/calendar/ to view upcoming guests!

If you would like to be considered to be a guest on the show, email me, Rhonda@homemovielegacy.com

 

 

 

                 2805 West Magnolia Blvd, Burbank, CA 91505

Categories: Home Movie Archiving, super 8 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Get REEL About Your Home Movie Legacy Before It’s Too Late! A free teleseminar from the Super 8 Experts!

Get “REEL” About Your Home Movie Legacy Before It’s Too Late!

A Free Teleseminar – September 18th, 2012

rhondabookA new book from Pro8mm, by Rhonda Vigeant, Get “REEL” About Your Home Movie Legacy Before It’s Too Late is coming this fall!

Join us on Tuesday, September 18 for a free teleseminar, where Rhonda will share practical tips from her book about caring for your old film reels, best practices for digitizing and a clear call to action for creating and sharing a home movie legacy that lives!

  • Clues from the box: How to use film boxes, film types and notes to figure out what might be on a reel
  • Call to action for creating and sharing a home movie legacy that lives
  • Fantastic tips on how to care for your original 16mm, 8mm, and super 8 film material.
  • Best practices for digitizing- how to create a modern work flow to get your analog material into your digital life.
  • How your films can bridge the generation gap, the importance of oral histories, ways to share on social media, and even monetize your film as stock footage.
  • Best practices for dealing with deteriorating film
  • Types of transfer methods- Film Chain vs. Flying Spot Scanner

rhondaheadshotRhonda Vigeant is co-owner and Vice President of Marketing at Pro8mm, a company dedicated to the professional use of Super 8 for both production an archiving. Rhonda has over 30 years experience working with the home movie legacies of film industry moguls, famous faces, and the masses! She is a member of the Southern California Genealogical Society and is a catalyst for promotiong the use of home movies, in research of family history.null

We will be announcing our 2012 Holiday Home Movie Deals at the teleseminar!

Categories: Home Movie Archiving | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A New Promise for Blu-Ray Technology

Recently I had a customer approach me about doing a large, home movie legacy high-definition scan to Blu-ray so that she could show over 17 hours worth of film on 10 different stations at a memorial service. Given my past experiences with blue-ray technology, I was a bit nervous and braced for trouble. I guess I was a bit prejudiced by all the bad experiences I have had thus far with Blu-ray technology. I was a huge fan in the beginning. I believed that it would quickly replace DVD and give Super 8 filmmakers a way to see their work in the incredible quality of HD. Living through the minor problems with recordable DVD, I was prepared for some problems. But to my surprise Blu-ray was actually much more difficult.

Blu-Ray got off to a very rocky start. In many ways this was due to the difficulties of dealing with HD, compatibility in players and new concepts like firmware. Although the image quality was impressive, the problems using this medium in the beginning were almost overwhelming. Unlike DVD that was quickly embraced by the public, Blu-ray has been stumbling every step of the way.

I purchased my first Blu-ray player in 2008. I got one of the best brands and most expensive players to insure I had the best of what was being offered. It wasn’t long before I realized the many shortcomings of the medium. Although the quality was amazing, both my recorded Blu-Ray’s and commercial disc’s would often would not play. I once spent a complete Saturday trying to download a firmware update, burn it to CD, and install it in my player. Even after a whole day’s work, it wouldn’t play and I had to wait for a disc from the manufacture. It took 4 days to get an update from the manufacture, and then I could finally play a new commercial Blu-ray release. During 2008, I purchase 3 more players from different manufactures for testing. Some disc would play in 3 out of the 4, sometimes the menus worked on one machine and not on the other, and I could get the BD-R’s to play if I hit enter, but it would crash if I hit play. All these problems are not a lot of fun when you think you are picking a format that is universal and easy to play, but it fact it is the opposite!

Things did not evolve very quickly in those early years of Blu-ray. The public, as well as my interest, was tested to its limits of tolerance. Along with the inconsistencies of the disc, the job of making a recordable Blu-ray disc was also very slow and riddled with compatibility problems of its own.

But in 2012, with this new project of 17 hours of home movies that the client wanted on Blu-ray, I decided to give Blu-ray one more chance and a fresh look. The first thing I did was purchase a new player. Since 2008, the cost of Blu-ray players has come down significantly, even for a very high quality player. The manufactures have also added new features to make them more universal. The new Sony BDP-S390 I acquired for testing had the specs I needed for this job was around $100.00. It played my BD-R (Recordable Blu-Ray) perfectly first time in 1080 at the amazing quality. It worked so well with Blu-Ray we tested it with just about everything else we had. It played every test DVD we had in the office no problem as well as run media from a USB Flash drive. If that was not enough it is WI-FI compatible so we logged onto the internet and could play movies I had uploaded into the Cloud on You-Tube. The Wi-Fi is also critical to doing an easy firmware update. What an amazing transformation from 2008.

The memorial service was an amazing success. Rather than making an edited composite media piece, the concept of showing every aspect of a person life through their home movies was an impressive way to present a person’s life story. The newer technology of Blu-ray made it all possible to showcase hours of HD quality home movie legacy footage flawlessly.

If you were turned off by the Blu-ray experience as I was, you should as I have fresh look. Start with a new player, as the newer devices are incredible and affordable. The promise of Blu-ray is finally here.

Categories: Home Movie Archiving | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Healing Through Home Movies

I have often told my clients over the years that one of the most often overlooked, but important reasons that you want to move your home movie archive onto a hard drive, sooner rather than later is to “BE READY”.

While we often associate Being Ready with a planned event such as that 50th anniversary party or retirement dinner happening sometime in the future, there are other times in life that you find you will want to be ready for something unexpected.

Our family recently had the tragic experience of loosing a family member quite suddenly.  In the shock and sadness of this also came the realization that we, as the keepers of the family archive would have only a few days to edit together a beautiful memorial piece that would be shown at the Wake. Instead of being a daunting task trying to collect material from various people and sources and rushing to get them hastily digitized, because we were ready, the experience was in an unexpected way part of our healing.  Because we were ready, we found that the process  of putting together this tribute piece offered us a feeling of comfort, and was a vital part of our mourning and grieving. As we scrolled through her life on film from baby, to child, to teen, to bride, to mother, and so much more, we laughed, we cried, and most of all we were grateful that we would be able to bring others comfort in their sadness with an amazing story of wonderful memories of our loved ones life, which we set beautifully to music.

More importantly, we could do the editing ourselves, without the assistance of strangers or a company recommended by the funeral home.   Just about a year ago we encoded the entire family archive that were  gathered from several generations of different family members home movies to file format.  This was a huge improvement from our prior version which was DVD.  You can not edit a DVD, so there was  no option for extracting clips.  This version has the home movies encoded to digital files on a  Codec called  Pro Rez  422.   The entire archive was organized into playlists on several hard drives. This encoding gave us the ability to plug the hard drive into our Mac Computer  We could quickly scan through each film and extract clips of our loved one throughout her life.   We were then able to  edit the clips to tell a story.  We are not experienced editors, but these new programs are extremely easy to use.  We used Final Cut Pro, but imovie, or any computer base editing system (compatible with the Codec you chose) will work.  We found appropriate music.  The process took about 6 hours to look through 1 TB drive worth of material, select our clips and edit them.

We were able to burn our  10 minutes edited piece onto a  DVD to play on a loop at the Wake.  In addition, we  burned  copies to give to family members so that they would have this tribute as a permanent memorial to our loved one.  The power of this cannot even be put into words.

I think especially during those private moment of sadness and grieving, the ability to create a story without the assistance of strangers or a hired production company is so wonderful.  It is an extension of the love you feel for the departed, and allows you to  tell the story that you want to tell, the way you want to tell it as a visual Eulogy.

I hope this post will help motivate you to be ready for whatever life’s events can be more fully realized through the memories and healing power that lie within your family films.  Our loved ones and their legacy live on and are sustained through our photographs and films.  Take care of them, and treat them with the integrity they deserve.

-Rhonda Vigeant (c) February 23, 2012

http://vimeo.com/32595596    (sample) 

“Mourning is one of the most profound human experiences that it is possible to have… The deep capacity to weep for the loss of a loved one and to continue to treasure the memory of that loss is one of our noblest human traits”. (—Edwin Shneidman, 1980)

 

Categories: Home Movie Archiving, super 8, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Is There a Super 8 Life Style?

Wikipedia defines lifestyle in its simplest terms as “the way people
live”

Some lifestyles are easy to define.  Just watch an episode of  “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” or a National Geographic show that has a segment on some indigenous culture.  We see the lifestyle of the people pretty clearly.

In the 21st Century, particularly here in the West, there are more lifestyle options than ever before, and they are not all defined by socio-economics. Our choices for health and wellness, sexual orientation, products we use, how we transport ourselves, the way we socialize,  are choices that reflect our life style. The essence of our being.

To me, lifestyle is every day life. What we wear. What music we listen too. How we celebrate. I love to watch the everyday life of people’s home movies from the 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s shot on 8mm or super 8mm film. I can walk into our scanning suite any day of the week and get a nostalgia fix when I catch a glance of a birthday party, Christmas gathering, family BBQ, beach day or Disney outing. There is something so calming about the footage. Parts of it are always predictable. I identify with it. It slows me down from the constant pounding on my computer, ipad, or smart phone. It takes me back. It makes me feel good. It reminds me – I’m ok.

I like seeing the woman dress the way my mother dressed in that era. The shape of the eyeglasses, the dishes on the table, the cars.  I get really excited when I see a lamp that is the same style of one I grew up with, or a fabric pattern that was iconic in its day.

More and more I hear filmmakers I work with say that one of the things they like best about shooting on super 8 film is the “lifestyle behind it”. When I first heard people talking in this way, I thought they meant the surf culture or the skateboard culture, or even the adult film culture of which so much has been captured on 8mm film over the decades. So I started asking, what do you mean? What is the super 8 lifestyle?  Do you mean the lifestyle of the filmmaker who chooses super 8 as the way they want to tell a story or “Lifestyle Filmmaking shot on super 8 film”?

After giving this some thought, I think I have decided it is both. There is a certain type of filmmaker who defines the super 8 life style, and clearly chooses to tell stories on this medium. They are Independent. Hands On. Above average intelligence.   They like counter-culture. They are a Risk Taker. Personable. Humble. Modest. Generous. Grateful. Patient. And, amazingly creative.  The Super 8 filmmakers that I know who are the most successful with their super 8 filmmaking possess a majority of these qualities. And it is these qualities that really put these filmmakers in a league of their own when it comes to getting the shots that are romantic, playful, emotional, personal, intimate, and heartfelt.

Filmmaker George Manzanilla who shoots his spots for Billabong on Super 8 film says what he likes is that it is the emotional connection you are able to make with the subject when you shoot them on Super 8 film. It’ s a personal format. You get images you can’t get from a digital camera. The way he shoots changes the relationship the models. http://youtu.be/V4YyFSlP7aQ

Feature filmmaker Kurt Markus and son Ian were the entire crew for the super 8 documentary “It’s About You – John Mellencamp”. His narration in the film speaks about how having another person along to do the sound would have changed the dynamic. Then they would not be just father and son messing around in America with their Super 8 cameras. http://vimeo.com/16177978

Look at music videos such as  “Two is Better Than One” (Boys Like Girls) The performance piece is shot on the Red Camera.  http://youtu.be/cUMfdoIXv4U The love story is shot on super 8. It feels so real and touches emotions deep with in your soul. Or singer Harper Simons “Berkley Girl”  (shot by Ben Kutsko from The Masses) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfXv6RBPEdI&feature=player_embedded

 Nowhere do we see this hankering for super 8-lifestyle filmmaking so prevalent as we do in weddings. While brides of the 80’s and 90’s were all about being shot on video, the past 10 years have shown a huge resurgence toward creating montage wedding footage on Super 8 film. Intimate. Personal. Playful. From simple low-budget weddings to Hollywood Celebrity Extravaganza Weddings, brides, grooms, and even the guests want to get in on the act. Check out the work of some of these amazing Wedding Filmmakers (and we have dozens more with just as awesome footage!) These are folks who have made a HUGE commitment to their craft, taking a risk (without video assist) at someone’s wedding that the footage being captured on 30-year-old cameras will do the job they were hired to do. This is not for the weak of heart. These wedding filmmakers personify the Super 8 lifestyle and personify the craft! Check out some of them and their amazing work.

Kate Headley http://www.kateheadleyphotography.com/

Braden Lower http://www.abryanphoto.com

Megan Hill http://hellosuper8.com/

Steve Moses http://vppvideo.com/

Michelle Walker http://layercakefilms.com/

The filmmakers themselves rave about the vintage charm.

Michelle Walker of Layer Cake Films on her website explains that as a super 8mm wedding film company, we create films that are original, offbeat, fun, and exciting. We strive to make custom stylized films that combine our generation’s style and sensibility with yesterday’s vintage film and retro feel. No melodramatic forced emotion! We are all about having fun and capturing the joy of your wedding day. We embrace offbeat couples.

Super 8 Film was invented as a home movie format to record the lifestyle of everyday living 50 feet at a time. Each roll is like a play list of 3 ½ minutes or less. A shot of life in  “reel” time.   Today we see a trend toward recapturing more simplistic, intimate story telling people are gravitating to simple stories. The cameras were designed for the average consumer, so that anyone could use it. I think we will see more and more filmmakers using Super 8 to capture this feeling of intimate lifestyle. The number of super 8 shots in commercials and in TV shows continues to grow with each passing. Full circle. Lifestyle filmmaking on super 8. Your own reality TV show.

How do you define the “Super 8 Lifestyle?  Please post your responses here!

You can also register for our FREE, teleseminar on Super 8 Lifestyle Filmmaking, Wednesday, May 11 at 4:30pm pacific (7:30pm eastern). Click here to read about the teleseminar and register: http://tinyurl.com/3sj6rhe

By Rhonda Vigeant. Director of Marketing, Pro8mm www.pro8mm.com

Categories: super 8 | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

8 Tips For Shooting Modern Super 8 #1 Brush Your Camera Gate

Ugh… there  is a hair  in the camera gate!  Nothing is more aggravating for  us and to you  when we  get absolutely gorgeous footage up on the scanner and there  is a big yucky piece of dirt or hair in the frame.  Just a small effort on your part will make your footage sparkle!  BRUSH YOUR CAMERA GATE! – Rhonda

# 1   Hair in the Gate:

“Because of the nature of film and the way it travels through a camera and exposes each frame, the system will build up debris in the gate.  If  it is  allowed to accumulate,  this  will block some of the image.  The metal gate frames the film with what should be a smooth black border.   Because you are running film over metal, it tends to leaves tiny deposits on the gate as the film passes over it.  This emulsion residue is a gummy substance that is barely visible to the naked eye.  If this is not cleaned  from your camera, from time to time you can have several problems.   First, the gummy glue can trap foreign substances like hair, lint, and dust and hold it firmly, often where the image is taken in a camera.  This  results   in these  ugly black globs  which start around the boarder that blocks some of your image usually on the edges,  but sometimes  big enough to block a lot of picture.   Depending on the size of these foreign obstacles, a hair in the gate can ruin a shot.   In addition, the build up of emulsion can get so bad that your camera can physically scratch the film.   The fix for these problems is very simple.   Go to the store and purchase a child’s toothbrush.  Gently brush a few strokes between every cartridge.   Every, single, cartridge!   It is amazingly simple but incredibly effective.   Do not use compressed air as all that will do is blow dirt around, and  it might blow debris into somewhere you cannot get it out.   In addition, compressed air does not often have the force to move the object because remember, it is stuck in place.    Do not use a Q-tip, as the chance of leaving a fiber of cotton is greater then the good you will do by performing the cleaning.”                                                                                     (c) Pro8mm ™ , by Phil Vigeant 2009

If your camera has never been cleaned,  you might need to do some more extensive work.  Once it is clean, the brush trick is all that should be need to keep you hair free.

Pro8mm includes a free camera gate brush with every rental or purchase.  They are also available for sale  on our website for $5.00  at  www.pro8mm.com.   A nifty little  tool  that fold up small and has  an attached cover, so you don’t have to worry about loosing it.     Once you use it on your camera, we do not advise using it as a substitute for gum or mints when you  have been on the set all day, or for that matter, the other way around!  www.pro8mm.com

Our Tip #2 will be on THE 85 Filter Situation.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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